Posted in A2 Theory, GCSE Sociology, General Sociology, Uncategorized

What is Marxism?

Advertisements
Posted in General Sociology

Challenges for Men in the 21st Century

https://www.tutor2u.net/sociology/blog/challenges-for-men-in-the-21st-century:

The growing phenomena of bigorexia for men is something which has arguably only ‘popped’ up on the scene in the last 5 years, however, it has sociologically speaking been around forever.

The changing paradigm surrounding masculinity has seen it go through many stages in a brief period.

However, this clip once again from the BBC highlights an interesting slant on how masculinity in the 21st century has become obsessed with the notion of physical strength being the perfect representation of man.

This could be explored in a lesson through a juxtaposition to the 21st-century representation of women and exploring similarities and differences, as well the role of secondary socialisation in particular media in shaping representations.

Also, the recent release of ‘Boys’ by Charli XCX would also serve as a good stimulus in exploring gender identity and masculinity, in particular, as often it is overlooked when teaching gender.

Posted in General Sociology

Alcoholism – a middle class problem?

The working class and young are often vilified for being deviant but increasing research identifies that the middle class are drinking more:

Main points (taken from ONS)

  • In Great Britain, 57.0% of Opinions and Lifestyle Survey respondents aged 16 years and over in 2017 drank alcohol, which equates to 29.2 million people in the population.
  • Young people aged 16 to 24 years in Great Britain are less likely to drink than any other age group; when they do drink, consumption on their heaviest drinking day tends to be higher than other ages.
  • 20.4% of survey respondents reported that they did not drink alcohol at all.
  • England had the highest proportion of adults who said they drank alcohol in the previous week (57.8%), followed by Scotland (53.5%) and then Wales (50.0%); of the English regions, among consumers of alcohol, binge drinking was more common in the North West and least common in the South East.
  • People working in managerial and professional occupations, in addition to the highest earners, were most likely to say they drank alcohol in the past week.

 

 

Posted in General Sociology

The propaganda of ‘British values’ is a distortion of history – video

Image result for akala

Manners, aristocracy, freedom: all things we tend to think of as inherent British values. But, says rapper Akala, we are taught a distorted version of history which erases serious political struggle. That, he argues, is what really bought us the fragile freedoms we have today

https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/commentisfree/video/2016/oct/05/akala-the-propaganda-of-british-values-is-a-distortion-of-history-video

Posted in General Sociology

BSA Teaching Group National A-Level Sociology Competition for Students!

The BSA Teaching Group’s National A Level Competition invites essays and short videos from sociology students allowing you to win an Apple iPad Mini and £500 for your school. Enter now via by emailing your submission to Claire Simmons, Membership Development Officer.

The A Level Competition is open to anyone currently studying at A Level, AS Level, Scottish Higher Level or equivalent post-16 qualification in sociology, and we encourage you to be as creative as possible with your answers!

This year’s question ‘What can Sociology contribute to the debate about “fake news”? The aim of this question is to get you thinking about news and public information and to link to the modules you have studied or are about to study. To enter all you need to do is submit a 2,000-word written piece or a 10-minute podcast or video clip. The closing date for this is Friday, 15 December 2017.

Entries are expected to refer to results obtained from their own primary method of research using a suitable sample.  This could be an observation, an interview or a questionnaire based study.  All research carried out for this competition has to abide the ethical guidelines of research, as stated in the BSA’s Statement of Ethical Practice. If you have any questions regarding the competition criteria, please contact: Claire Simmons.

How to enter:

Please email your entry with a completed entry form to Claire Simmons or post it to:

Claire Simmons,
Membership Development Officer
British Sociological Association
Bailey Suite
Palatine House
Belmont Business Park
Belmont
Durham
DH1 1TW

Terms and conditions:

  • Entries must be accompanied by confirmation from a Sociology teacher that it is the work of the pupil.
  • Entries must be lone submissions (not joint).
  • Reports must be around 2,000 words (excluding bibliography, figures, tables etc.)
  • Filming your project as a presentation or podcast/YouTube entry (must not exceed 10 minutes).
  • We reserve the right to check submitted works for plagiarism using online tools.
  • Reference to other scholars (including teachers, books, articles and web sites) should be acknowledged.
  • All work must be written or presented in the English language.
  • The judges’ decision is final and we reserve the right to publish your entry with your permission.
Posted in General Sociology

Year 13 Sociology trip to the University of Sussex

trip.jpg

Year 13 Sociology students enjoyed a really fruitful visit to the University of Sussex. After a quick pit stop for drinks and snacks, the day started with a talk by an ex-student giving introduction to student life. We learnt about the ‘dos and don’ts’ of writing UCAS personal statements, the myriad of societies on offer, degree types, scholarships, accommodation and much, much more.

Dr. Paul McGuinness then delivered a really interesting lecture examining the differences between classic and positivist approaches to criminology. For example, we learnt about the enlightenment period and the influence of social contract theory upon neo-liberalism. The lecture was not ‘dumbed down’ at all for our students and whilst some found the language and style quite daunting and very different to A-level lessons, it gave them a valuable insight into the teaching at universities. Moreover, much of the lecture content is directly applicable to the A-level specification so the lecture should give our students a real advantage when they are trying to access the higher grades.

After a tour of the campus and canteen lunch, students attended their second lecture of the day with Dr. Jamie Barnes who deconstructed culture and gender by applying some of the key arguments of Marcel Mauss, Pierre Bourdieu and Iris Marion Young to help challenge conventional thinking about these social factors. The highlight of the lecture was when Dr Barnes asked the students and teachers to model gendered behaviour, whilst slightly embarrassing, it was a fun way to help emphasise how gender is ‘embodied’ and whilst our behaviour appears natural, it is far from it.