Posted in A2 Sociology: Crime and Deviance, GCSE Sociology

UK police force failed to record 10,000 crimes

A perfect example of unrecorded crime – why we can’t trust police statistics.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS) found that nearly one in five crimes reported to Lincolnshire police were undocumented.

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Posted in A2 Sociology: Crime and Deviance, GCSE Sociology

Knife crime: the reality behind the news stories

This is a must read or listen. This year, for the first time, The Guardian have managed to gain access to UK knife crime stats from the past 40 years and this article successfully summarises the main findings:

https://www.theguardian.com/membership/2018/jun/21/radical-lessons-knife-crime-beyond-the-blade

https://open.spotify.com/episode/7wboLfpSJz4kTQZ5lvemQp?si=ZeRvAJp6QHmI2eXgjwPaEg

 

Posted in AS Sociology: Family, GCSE Sociology

Toxic childhood

“…for many young people, the internet has already all but replaced children’s television. According to recent research by Ofcom, British 12- to 15-year-olds are more familiar with YouTube than with the BBC or ITV, while the amount of television watched by four- to 15-year-olds has fallen by 25% since 2010″.

The article explores how children are exposed to lots of content on YouTube which most adults would consider inappropriate:

  • Ohioan Logan Paul
  • PewDiePie
  • Advertising
  • Fake Peppa Pig videos

“Very young children,” James Bridle writes, are “being deliberately targeted with content which will traumatise and disturb them, via networks which are extremely vulnerable to … abuse.” Given the scale of YouTube, he went on, “human oversight is simply impossible”.

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/jan/09/how-childrens-tv-went-from-blue-peter-to-youtube-wild-west?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Email