Posted in A2 Sociology: Religion, Uncategorized

A level – secularisation – So Christianity is no longer the norm?

Here are the key highlights from the article by

  • “Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone, and probably gone for good,” Prof Stephen Bullivant
  • Ormerod argues that it’s a mistake to assume that under 30s have changed that drastically because there is a significant evidence that they are still willing to wholeheartedly embrace alternatives to religion.
  • Older generations are not completely embracing rationality either because new age movements such as astrology are enjoying a renaissance
  • Linda Woodhead points out that although lots of British teenagers identify that they have no religion, most don’t describe themselves as atheists.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/22/christianity-norm-underground-mystery?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Email

 

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Author:

Sociology and Media Studies teacher at Hazelwick School, West Sussex. Former teacher at Felpham Community College and Doha College

One thought on “A level – secularisation – So Christianity is no longer the norm?

  1. Reblogged this on Into the Clarities and commented:
    Good summary of the article on secularization as it bears upon conscious affiliation (_i.e._, explicit commitment), and the benefits of this for everyone. Read the very short article he links to at the bottom, and do yourself a favor and scan the other posts by Ormerod at the top. Ormerod suggest that things, as they are, will remain so “for at least the next 100 years” or something. Optimistic? Perhaps. Christianity is, as one atheist put it, “the stone in the shoe that one cannot quite get rid of”; our present culture has deep roots, and most of us are not aware of the elements of our culture, or their provenance and sustaining springs; it is a live question for me as to whether we ever really become “post-Christian” in anything more than a superficial sense — though if we do, we certainly become post-_Christian_. To this end, read Blumenberg’s _The Legitimacy of the Modern Age_, Löwith’s _Meaning in History_, and Taylor’s _A Secular Age_ to get a better sense of this relationship from multiple angles. Then, of course, there is Nietzsche, together with a host of other authors. One thing is clear, though: secularization is not irreligion or atheism. It is something else. More soon. (But give _Imagining Sociology_ a follow: it’s a classroom resource for a UK teacher, so it’s not as regular as some blogs, but it’s great.)

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