Posted in General Sociology

The propaganda of ‘British values’ is a distortion of history – video

Image result for akala

Manners, aristocracy, freedom: all things we tend to think of as inherent British values. But, says rapper Akala, we are taught a distorted version of history which erases serious political struggle. That, he argues, is what really bought us the fragile freedoms we have today

https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/commentisfree/video/2016/oct/05/akala-the-propaganda-of-british-values-is-a-distortion-of-history-video

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Posted in A2 crime and deviance, GCSE Sociology

Institutional racism – Stephen Lawrence 25 Years On

The Metropolitan police handout photo of Stephen Lawrence, murdered on 22 April 1993.

If you get the chance to watch this, I would recommend it. The 3 part documentary is an excellent summary of the failures of the Stephen Lawrence story and why it’s still so significant today:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b0br42

 

Posted in A2 Sociology: Religion, Uncategorized

A level – secularisation – So Christianity is no longer the norm?

Here are the key highlights from the article by

  • “Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone, and probably gone for good,” Prof Stephen Bullivant
  • Ormerod argues that it’s a mistake to assume that under 30s have changed that drastically because there is a significant evidence that they are still willing to wholeheartedly embrace alternatives to religion.
  • Older generations are not completely embracing rationality either because new age movements such as astrology are enjoying a renaissance
  • Linda Woodhead points out that although lots of British teenagers identify that they have no religion, most don’t describe themselves as atheists.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/22/christianity-norm-underground-mystery?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Email

 

Posted in AS Sociology: Family, GCSE Sociology

Toxic childhood

“…for many young people, the internet has already all but replaced children’s television. According to recent research by Ofcom, British 12- to 15-year-olds are more familiar with YouTube than with the BBC or ITV, while the amount of television watched by four- to 15-year-olds has fallen by 25% since 2010″.

The article explores how children are exposed to lots of content on YouTube which most adults would consider inappropriate:

  • Ohioan Logan Paul
  • PewDiePie
  • Advertising
  • Fake Peppa Pig videos

“Very young children,” James Bridle writes, are “being deliberately targeted with content which will traumatise and disturb them, via networks which are extremely vulnerable to … abuse.” Given the scale of YouTube, he went on, “human oversight is simply impossible”.

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/jan/09/how-childrens-tv-went-from-blue-peter-to-youtube-wild-west?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Email

Posted in General Sociology

BSA Teaching Group National A-Level Sociology Competition for Students!

The BSA Teaching Group’s National A Level Competition invites essays and short videos from sociology students allowing you to win an Apple iPad Mini and £500 for your school. Enter now via by emailing your submission to Claire Simmons, Membership Development Officer.

The A Level Competition is open to anyone currently studying at A Level, AS Level, Scottish Higher Level or equivalent post-16 qualification in sociology, and we encourage you to be as creative as possible with your answers!

This year’s question ‘What can Sociology contribute to the debate about “fake news”? The aim of this question is to get you thinking about news and public information and to link to the modules you have studied or are about to study. To enter all you need to do is submit a 2,000-word written piece or a 10-minute podcast or video clip. The closing date for this is Friday, 15 December 2017.

Entries are expected to refer to results obtained from their own primary method of research using a suitable sample.  This could be an observation, an interview or a questionnaire based study.  All research carried out for this competition has to abide the ethical guidelines of research, as stated in the BSA’s Statement of Ethical Practice. If you have any questions regarding the competition criteria, please contact: Claire Simmons.

How to enter:

Please email your entry with a completed entry form to Claire Simmons or post it to:

Claire Simmons,
Membership Development Officer
British Sociological Association
Bailey Suite
Palatine House
Belmont Business Park
Belmont
Durham
DH1 1TW

Terms and conditions:

  • Entries must be accompanied by confirmation from a Sociology teacher that it is the work of the pupil.
  • Entries must be lone submissions (not joint).
  • Reports must be around 2,000 words (excluding bibliography, figures, tables etc.)
  • Filming your project as a presentation or podcast/YouTube entry (must not exceed 10 minutes).
  • We reserve the right to check submitted works for plagiarism using online tools.
  • Reference to other scholars (including teachers, books, articles and web sites) should be acknowledged.
  • All work must be written or presented in the English language.
  • The judges’ decision is final and we reserve the right to publish your entry with your permission.